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20130113
20130121
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CSPAN 8
MSNBCW 3
CSPAN2 2
KQED (PBS) 2
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English 26
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
're going to face it again, you know, debt ceiling stuff, what is the republican strategy in dealing with the democrats? david. >> you know, mike, i was on capitol hill this week talking to top republicans, and i'm getting a sense and you're seeing it written about as well, that they would maybe like to step away from the brink about the debt ceiling. they do want to force the issue about how can they get this president to agree to additional spending cuts? the debt ceiling is a dangerous game. i think they recognize that politically. they'll push -- the question is how -- how do they push on the debt ceiling? do they say, look, we'll give you a short-term extension of the debt ceiling for a certain amount of spending cuts, or we'll give you a long-term extension like you want for even more spending cuts. can they force entitlement reform around medicare, for instance, even some of the -- in their view -- more limited things that the president wants to do around means testing and age and indexing to try to attach that to a debt-limit deal. do they move beyond the debt limit, try to g
that this deal now would have to include an extension of the debt ceiling that they just got to avoid the fiscal cliff. well, he ultimately folded on that. so as a tactical matter, even in their minority position, they can look at this and see, well, there is some gain to be gotten here if we keep pushing on this. i think the flip side of this is also a big challenge for the president. if he really wants to unshackle the economy, if he wants to get more robust economic growth, does he not want to be more proactive about dealing with some of these entitlements, with dealing with the budget picture, even where he has real problems with his supposed, you know, partners in this to republicans? does he not want to take advantage of the power he has to try to advance this, to get more robust economic growth independent of his misgivings about his partners here on capitol hill. >> chuck, i think it's fair to say that harry reid was somewhat marginalized during negotiation biden sort of swooped in to save the day. what do you see as his role going forward as we edge toward these upcoming fiscal cliffs?
with them rather than stand with home common ground. >> eric: how about dealing with the debt ceiling and mr. boehner he won't negotiate anymore? >> the president is going to have to reach across the aisle and demonstrate sincerely he will listen and work. he has to show up for negotiations. he was an absent president when it came to negotiating some of the solutions to the big problems during his first term. he has to be part of the solution and work with congress to try to get things done. we watched george w. bush do it when he did it in a controversial election, first term and second term. first term he reached across the aisle and got tax cuts for everyone even though the united states senate switched majority control from republicans to democrats in may of his first year in office. then he worked across the aisle to get education reform done. it can happen, but it takes a president who is willing to be presidential and really lead rather than just demand. >> eric: do you think he can take a page from george w. bush. what did you advise the president at that time and what lessons from t
the debt ceiling is raised. republicans want the president to cut spending before they i gree on a deal. but the president at no time seem eager for compromise. listen. >> we have to stop lurking from crisis to crisis to crisis. when there is a clear pass that requires discipline, responsibility and compromise. >> dana: yet, he showed little willingness to do so. >> i'm willing to compromise and find common ground over how to reduce the deficit, america cannot afford another debate with this congress about whether or not they should pay the bills they have racked up. what i will not do is to have that negotiation with gun at the head of the people. >> dana: interesting choice of words to describe that. eric, you talked about not wanting the country to lurch from crisis to crisis. most americans would agree and want washington to fix fundamental problems. why do we have to have the debate every three months? >> eric: sure. start with the debt ceiling and how it came about. prior to world war i, everybody was paid. the debt we incurred was paid for through various bonds. world war i to wo
, deals contingent upon raising the debt ceiling and you yourself, related to debt or budget related maneuvers. and what many people are curious about the new adamant desire on your part not to negotiate that seems to conflict with the entire hire in the modern era of the presidents and the debt ceiling and your own debt ceiling and doesn't it suggest we're going into a default situation because no one is talking to each other about this. >> no, major, i think if you look at the history. getting votes for the debt ceiling is difficult and votes in in town are difficult. i went through this last year. what is different we never saw a situation like we saw last year in which certain groups in congress took such an absolutist position that we came within a few days of defaulting. >> lou dobbs is the host of lou dobbs tonight on the fox business network. lou, welcome back. what an extraordinary exchange we saw the president have on that issue. basically his position was, we're raising the debt ceiling whether congress wants to or not. i'm not negotiating with them on it. i'm not followin
and the time we deal with the debt ceiling and we may meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and to put us on that path. talk didn't come here to about any of those important subjects today, because as important as they all are today we have a more urgent and immediate call and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics better than anyone so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i owe an incredible debt of gratitude to you at the head table and those of you in the room. i know we don't have unanimity in this ballroom nor do we in any ballroom, but we all acknowledge that we have to do something. we have to act. and i hope we all agree, there is a need to respond to the carnage on our streets and in our schools. i hope we all agree that mass shootings like the one we witnessed in newtown 34 days ago cannot be continued to be tolerated. that tragedy has affected the public psyche in a way i have never seen before. the image of first graders, not only shot,
on the debt ceiling. >> the issue here is whether or not america pays its bills. we are not a deadbeat nation. >> taking a stand on the one-month anniversary of the newtown massacre. the families speak out. >> this is a promise to turn the conversation into actions. things must change. this is the time. this is a promise we make to our precious children because each child, every human life, is filled with promise, and though we continue to be filled with unbearable pain, we choose love, belief, and hope instead of anger. >> calling them out. tough words from former secretary of state general colin powell for his fellow republicans on race. >> there's also a dark vein of intolerance many some parts of the party. >> the end of the longest war and the man president obama has nominated to wind it down coming up. retired general stanley mcchrystal on chuck hagel. the exit strategy from afghanistan and his own career. >>> plus, show stopper. president clinton he should the standing ovation with his surprise appearance on "lincoln" at the golden globes. >> in "lincoln" we see a man more interesting
they have to deal with the debt ceiling as l. i spoke to one of the president's closest advisers who told me, point blank, the president has told him, he knows he has about a year to get the big things done. then he becomes a lame duck and then you have to start shifting more and more toward foreign policy, traveling around the world. on the domestic agend ahe has a very short time before he becomes a lame duck. >> the president's inaugural address tomorrow is a tradition that dates back to george washington in 1789. the president plans to look ahead more than back in the speech. let's get some insight from the wall street journal columnist. what are your thoughts on what the president needs to say in order to be most effective, to best set himself up, going into the next four years? >> reporter: well, i don't know. we will find out what he and his aides have decided about that, just about 24 hours from now. i think a second inaugural address is always a little bit difficult, you know? a first inaugural, everybody's new and excited and it's like superman coming out of the telephone booth and
between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling, that we may very well be able to meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over ten years, and in the long-term deficit and put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today because, as important as they all are, today we have a more urgent and immediate call, and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics very well so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i might add, oui an incredible debt of gratitude to many of you at the head table as well as those of you in the room. i know we don't have absolutely unanimity in this ballroom, nor do we in anyway ballroom, but we all know, everyone acknowledges, we have to do something. we have to act. i hope we're all agreed that there's a need to respond to the carnage on our streets and in our schools. i hope we all agree that mass shootings like the ones we witnessed in newton 34 days ago, cannot continue to be tolerated. that tragedy in all my yea
come out and said that if washington doesn't deal with the debt ceiling, they could be downgrading the united states, the watch for that. once again the debt ceiling. i want to point out one thing. the last time we went -- whole drama about the debt ceiling, we got downgraded, do you know what happened to the interest rates? they went down dramatically. yeah. the -- treasury market actually went up. happened to be the same time that europe was going through its crisis. and -- the safest investment in the world seen at the time is still by many people in the world is the u.s. government debt despite the huge amounts of it we continue to borrow. >> are you still traveling around the world? >> yeah. i'm the chief international correspondent. fourth quarter was dominated by domestic news. i did travel in the fourth quarter. we are waiting to see if the italian elections with berlusconi should be interesting. waiting for chavez the die. >> that should be a party. >> always interesting. >> come back when you can. >> if you can stick around as much as possible so we don't have to talk to
, between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling, we may very well be able to meet the goal we set out to do, which is to have roughly $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and put us on that past. i didn't come here to talk about any of this important subjects today because as important as they all are today we have a mortgage and indie media call and that is how to do with the epidemic of gun violence in america. the one of the statistics better than anyone, so i'm not going to repeat it. on that score i might add ale in a credible threat of gratitude to many of you at the table as well as those of you in the room. i know we don't have unanimity and this ballroom, nor do we have any ballroom, but we all know, it wanted knowledges we have to do some gain. we have to act and i hope we all agree there's a need to respond to the carnage on our streets and in our schools. i hope we all agree that mass shootings like the one we witnessed in your newton cannot be tolerated. that tragedy in public life has affected the public safety in a way that i've never seen before.
deals that were contingent upon or in the context of raising the debt ceiling. you, yourself, four times have done that. three times, those were related to deficit reduction or budget maneuvers. what chuck and i and i think many people are curious about is this new, adamant desire on your part not to negotiate, when that seems to conflict with the entire history in the modern era of american presidents and the debt ceiling, and your own history on the debt ceiling. and doesn't that suggest that we are going to go into a default situation because no one is talking to each other about how to resolve this? >> well, no, major, i think if you look at the history, getting votes for the debt ceiling is always difficult, and budgets in this town are always difficult. i went through this just last year. but what's different is we never saw a situation as we saw last year in which certain groups in congress took such an absolutist position that we came within a few days of defaulting. and the fact of the matter is, is that we have never seen the debt ceiling used in this fashion, where the notion
of the neighbors, cooler heads will prevail now between now and the time we deal with the debt ceiling and we may meet the goal which we set out to do, which is to have roughly a $4 trillion cut over 10 years in the long-term deficit and to put us on that path. but i didn't come here to talk about any of those important subjects today, because as important as they allr today we have a more urgent and immediate call and that is how to deal with the epidemic of gun violence in america. you all know the statistics better than anyone so i'm not going to repeat them. on that score, i owe an incredible debt of gratitude to you at the head table and those of you in the room. i know we don't have you nan hit in this ballroom nor do we in any ballroom, but we all acknowledge that we have to do something. we have to act. and i hope we all agree, there is a need to respond to the carnage on our streets and in our schools. i hope we all agree that mass shootings like the one we witnessed in newtown 34 days ago cannot be continued to be tolerated. that tragedy has affected the public in a way i have never see
: the new republicans in congress were threatening to vote against raising the debt ceiling. if congress didn't act by august 2, the federal government would be unable to pay its bills. >> in 2010, when all these republicans were running for congress, many of them avowed tea partiers and the rest of them riding the tea party wave, the subject of the impending debt ceiling came up frequently and virtually all of them campaigned saying... pledging not to raise the debt ceiling. >> narrator: early on, republican freshmen attended orientation sessions. republican strategist frank luntz ran one of them. >> and i asked the question, how many of you are going to vote for the debt ceiling? and only three or four of them raised their hands. and i said, if you vote for the debt ceiling, the people who put you in office are going to knock you out. >> if you vote for the debt ceiling, you're voting for your own death certificate, political death certificate. >> narrator: for his part, the president decided to try something new: personal politics. he figured he could connect to the republican leader,
sit here tonight on the eve of the inauguration on monday, on -- just days ahead of debt ceiling conversations, days after fiscal cliff negotiations. was that deal good for poor people? >> for 30 years, we have not addressed this issue, except for the wonderful work that you and cornel are doing in these wonderful people on the panel. politics has neglected the poor. one could say that there was a war on the poor rather than a war on poverty for much of this period. the united states has by far the most poverty of any of the high-income countries as a share of the population. we have the highest in quality. we have the most entrenched underclass. we have had the biggest increases of any quality by leastnd we've had the political response of any high- income countries, so we are standing out on our own. this has been a 30-year trend of soaring in comes at the top, stagnation in the middle, and falling through the floor on the bottom, and the political system has refused to address this for 30 years. so we have reached a calamitous situation in this country, but the fact of the mat
to a deal. next, john from tennessee. caller: good morning. i am calling about the debt ceiling. yes, it does need to be raised. because we have to pay our bills. if the government is allowed to borrow money and set their circumstances, then why is the private business sector not allowed to do that? the federal reserve has been shut down as far as to the bankers, as far as the this man being able to borrow money. the industry in the united states needs money to operate on and and. we need to be able to borrow money. if his mrs. are not allowed to expand and grow, how do they expect to pay the us -- these debts down the road? get these guys out of here. they do not need to be making a lifetime commitment. they have gotten old and senile and did not even know where they are. it is a shame that our government has gone this far. it is just terrible. host: thank you for the call. if you're just joining us, or listening on c-span radio, thank you for joining us. the question we are asking is whether or not you think the president can bypass congress to raise the debt ceiling. you can join
congress to up the debt ceiling. of course what he said is, i know the republicans want to try to get some sort of spending cuts and stuff like that. i'll deal with it. just not over this. >>gretchen: so yesterday how has he changed now that he's president and he's been in a couple of these debt ceiling fights with republicans? another one is coming up in march. many people believe it is the only leverage the republicans hold in any kind of discussions about cutting spending. the president changing his tune now. listen to this. >> america cannot afford another debate with this congress about whether or not they should pay the bills they've already racked up. so to even entertain the idea of this happening, of the united states of america not paying its bills, is irresponsible. it's absurd. >>steve: so it was irresponsible for president bush to run up a huge bill. and now that he's president, it's irresponsible if the congress doesn't give him the blank check. let's just point out a couple of things. president bush all by his lonesome racked up about $5 trillion in debt. in eight years. pre
ahead of debt ceiling conversations, days after fiscal quick negotiations -- days after fiscal cliff negotiations. was that deal good for poor people? >> for 30 years, we have not addressed this issue, except for the wonderful work that you and cornel are doing in these wonderful people on the panel. politics has neglected the poor. one could say that there was a war on the poor rather than a war on poverty for much of this period. the united states has by far the most poverty of any of the high- income countries as a share of the population. we have the highest in quality. we have the most entrenched underclass. we have had the biggest increases of any quality by far, and we've had the least political response of any high- income countries, so we are standing out on our own. this has been a 30-year trend of soaring in comes at the top, stagnation in the middle, and falling through the floor on the bottom, and the political system has refused to address this for 30 years. so we have reached a calamitous situation in this country, but the fact of the matter is nothing that was done at
are some of the top republicans responding to president obama on this debt ceiling issue? >> reporter: well, jon, republicans are clearly uncomfortable with prominent democrats already talking about a tax increase when you consider the fiscal cliff deal raised taxes and every worker with a payroll tax hiring expiring and raised taxes on upper income americans even further, check your pay stub. a leading republican says responding to the president what's critical is getting spending under control. >> it's a compelling message saying we ned to pay the bills we've racked up. of it messes the whole point again. think of it in terms of a credit card. in you have a son or daughter who exceeds the limit, the first thing you do is rip up the card, the second thing you do is you say you need to change your spending habits. >> reporter: they say we need to a just what bills we are paying and how they are paying. jon: the issue of depending on disaster relief could provide tkraeupl drama there on capitol hill. >> reporter: speaker john boehner promised that the house would take up sandy relief bills
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)